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1. The Moral Center in Films

High Noon (1952) is a classic tale of a hero who must face mortal danger alone. The other “good” men in the town are either unable or unwilling to stand by his side, despite the fact that he cleaned up Hadleyville and made it a decent place to live. With his sense of responsibility, determination, and courage, Will Kane represents the moral center of the story—the character who exemplifies the right values and moral attributes. Miller’s gang is the threat to the hero, the direct cause of the dramatic tension in the story, but the true moral antitheses to Kane’s noble behavior are the townspeople, who are hypocrites and cowards. Amy is a character on a moral journey, and Helen Ramirez acts as her guide. Initially unwilling to support her husband and embrace the virtues he represents, she gets a lesson in loyalty when Ramirez advises her to stand by her man, which Amy ultimately does. 

Tags: film, movies, moral, morality, High Noon, Gary Cooper, Grace Kelly, western, stories
By Terry R. Bacon
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Lance, We Hardly Knew Ya

Lance Armstrong’s colossal house of cards recently came crashing down during two well-orchestrated interviews with Oprah Winfrey on national television.  For the media, it was a ratings extravaganza fueled by the public flogging of a once-revered sports legend.  For cycling insiders, it was the lancing of a boil that had been festering for years.  And for many Americans and others around the world it was the humiliating discovery that the hero they had worshipped and cheered through one victory after another was a fraud, a little like learning that your favorite uncle is a crook and a pedophile.

What makes Lance Armstrong’s downfall so bitter for us is that we had elevated him to such stellar heights.  He was the celebrity cancer survivor, the solemn spokesman for defeating death. A fierce competitor, driven and strong, he exemplified what you could make of yourself if you were as focused and determined and disciplined as he was.  He created Livestrong Foundation, the cancer nonprofit that raised the hopes of hundreds of thousands of cancer sufferers.  He won the Tour de France, the granddaddy of cycling’s grueling races, seven consecutive times.  He was everything we hoped we could be if only we were more like him.

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About Terry R. Bacon

Terry R Bacon

I am now retired from Korn/Ferry but am still affiliated with the firm as an Emeritus Scholar-in-Residence. Today, in addition to my writing, I continue to consult with select clients and continue to conduct research on leadership, power and influence, and other topics of interest to me. 

I was born in Topeka, Kansas in 1947 and grew up in Missouri and Iowa. I graduated from Treynor High School (in southwestern Iowa) in 1965 and did my undergraduate work at the United States Military Academy at West Point. I was in Company E2 and graduated with a BS in General Engineering in 1969. Shortly thereafter, I spent a year in Vietnam with the 101st Airborne Division and then several more years as a military intelligence officer. I left the Army in 1974 and went to The American University, Washington, DC, where I received a PhD in Literary Studies in 1977.

I moved to Utah after graduation, taught briefly as an adjunct professor at the University of Utah, and then joined a consulting company, Shipley Associates, where I became the vice president of research and development. I created a number of corporate education programs while at Shipley and co-authored, with Larry Freeman, the Shipley Associates Style Guide, which was published by John P. Wiley & Sons. In 1989, I left Shipley and founded Lore.

Besides providing leadership at Lore and doing considerable client work, I developed dozens of executive education programs and authored or co-authored the books featured on this site. I also continued my own education by studying strategic planning at the Wharton School of Business (University of Pennsylvania), sales management at the University of Chicago, leadership at Stanford University, psychology at Goddard College, and leading professional services firms at the Harvard Business School.

Prior to joining Korn/Ferry, I was the president and CEO of Lore International Institute, which I founded on July 1, 1989. Lore was a professional and executive development consulting firm that focused on the assessment, education, and coaching of professionals, managers, and executives around the world. As Lore grew, we formed a sister company in Europe and eventually had a global network of more than 300 faculty and coaches to serve primarily Fortune 500-type clients. In 2008, Lore was acquired by Korn/Ferry and is now part of one of the world’s largest talent management firms.

I have been active on the boards of a number of nonprofits, including the Women’s Resource Center in Durango, Colorado; the advisory board of the Durango Arts Center; the advisory board of Friends of the Fort Lewis College Theatre; the board of Music in the Mountains (where I served as president for two years); and the Fort Lewis College Foundation Board (where I served as chairman for three years).

In 2011, Amacom Books published two of my books:  Elements of Influence: The Art of Getting Others to Follow Your Lead, appeared in July 2011.  It is a companion to The Elements of Power: Lessons on Leadership and Influence, which appeared in January 2011. Together, these books present nearly two decades of research on power and influence.  Both of these books have been translated into Chinese, and Elements of Influence is now being translated into Estonian.

In 2012, Nicholas Brealey published my latest book (coauthored with Dr. Laurie Voss):  the 2nd edition of Adaptive Coaching, which initially appeared in 2003.

.The views expressed on this site are mine and do not reflect the views or opinions of Korn/Ferry International or the Korn/Ferry Institute.

 

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Email: terry@terryrbacon.com
Websites: www.terryrbacon.com, www.theelementsofpower.com

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